Injera Adventures

Stack of injera!

For my Ethiopian Feast I went all out – including making my own Injera. Google quickly told me that injera should be fermented, and is traditionally made with teff flour. Apparently in North America the starter is often a mixture of teff and wheat flour, which is not the classic method. More Google searches quickly eliminated many of the injera recipes that didn’t involve fermenting the starter or used wheat flour. Finally, I stumbled upon this recipe: http://chefinyou.com/2010/02/ethiopian-injera-recipe/.

I followed the directions almost exactly, and the injera turned out fantastic! I find it amusing that you have to ‘feed’ the starter and if everybody knew that fermenting starters made your apartment smell like a brewery everybody would be doing it! I made some minor adjustments at the end, because I ran out of teff flour. My Cole’s Notes method is below:

Day 0 – In a bowl, mix 3/4c. water, 1/2c. teff flour, 1/8t. active yeast

The injera adventure begins!

Day 3 – Stir and feed the starter 1/2c. water, 1/3c. teff flour. The kitchen should start to smell like a brewery!

Pre-feeding

Post-feeding

Day 5 (right before bed) – Stir and feed the starter 1/2c. water, 1/3c. teff flour. Almost done waiting!

Pre-feeding

Post-feeding

Day 6 (VERY early in the morning) – Using 1c. of the starter (I had 2.5c. total), feed the starter:

Pre-feeding

7c. water

4.5c. teff flour

1.5c. chickpea flour (besan)

1c. buckwheat flour

1t. salt

Post-feeding ... almost there!

Day 6 (6h ish after feeding) – Cook the injera! I used my biggest fry pan (~20cm diameter) and 1/3c. of batter for each injera, for a total of 33 injeras. The cooking instructions in the recipe are fantastic!

After final ferment - ready to cook!

I thought these injeras were better than those in restaurants. The ones in restaurants are good only as a scooping tool, and don’t taste great by themselves. Not only are these injeras fantastic scooping tools and compliment the dishes, but they also taste great by themselves! They also freeze great, making future Ethiopian feasts easier!

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