Green Posole with Corn Tortillas

Green Posole Stew served with homemade corn tortillas, avocado, and sliced radish

Posole is a slow-cook Mexican stew, similar to a chili. This particular stew is a hodgepodge of interesting flavours and textures ensuring that every delectable bite is a new and interesting flavour profile. This was my first experience with tomatillos and hominy, with varying degrees of success. Tomatillos are like gift wrapped green tomatoes, with a papery husk that you have to peel away before washing. Their skin is sticky, almost soapy when wet, making washing essential. In this recipe the tomatillos are first boiled until they lose some of their bright green colour and start to float like bobbing for apples, then quenched, then pureed in the food processor with onions, roasted jalapenos, and fresh herbs, making a delicious roasted sauce. At this point I couldn’t resist a taste, and their flavour is very different from normal tomatoes – delicious in their own right. I will definitely be using them in the future, perhaps in a roasted tomatillo salsa.

I first heard of hominy on the Food Network when a chef on either Top Chef or Chopped was making their version of “hominy and grits”. I have had grits before (never again!) but hominy … I tracked some down to discover it appears to be corn kernels that have been treated with lime somehow. Out of the can they don’t taste like anything, but in the stew they add a nice texture similar to a bean. My final verdict on hominy is that it’s an interesting ingredient, but not something I will be obsessed with (like jackfruit!).

Now onto the stew … This stew is a recipe from Viva Vegan! (page 137) and has many steps if you don’t have pre-made seitan on hand (which I didn’t). The seitan is the “white seitan” recipe (page 35), meant to replace chicken or pork. I am not a big lover of seitan as I find it too chewy, but I put it in the stew anyway. It was the only disappointing component, only because even though the stew is delicious, I still wasn’t a big fan of seitan. The next time I make this stew (and there will be a next time!) I will substitute the seitan for some tofu or tempeh, both of which I think would soak up the flavours of the delicious broth and add that extra bit of protein. The broth itself is an interesting kitchen adventure. First you roast some pepitas (pumpkin seeds) then grind them in the food processor. This both thickens the broth but also adds an unexpected layer of flavour that I could not get enough of. Then you add this mixture to the pureed tomatillos, resulting in a complex, delicious, and addictive stew base. The oddest combinations often work and this is no exception! The stew itself is then just composed of whatever greens you have on hand, beans, hominy, and the seitan. Delectable, delicious, and when served with homemade tortillas and avocado I wish it was a never-ending soup pot! It is one of the most interesting stews you will ever try, and worth the multiple steps!

The recipe can be found here on the Google Book Preview: Green Posole Seitan Stew with Chard and White Beans. However, if any of my recent posts haven’t convinced you yet (Pupusas, Curdito, and Simple Tomato Sauce; Sweet and Nutty Stuffed Plantains), this stew should be the tipping point for checking the book out at the library!

A note about Homemade Corn Tortillas:

I made my own corn tortillas to serve with this recipe, expanding my flatbread repertoire. Tortillas  as it turns out are very easy to make and super quick – I am not the fastest cook in the kitchen by any means, and even I managed to make 36 tortillas in under an hour! With nothing more than a rolling pin, some parchment paper, and a pan, you can make tortillas that taste so much better than the cardboard store bought ones you will wonder why you haven’t made them before! The dough is nothing more than masa harina and water, and is even on the side of the masa harina bag for you. Mix, play with the PlayDoh dough, roll between parchment to a size of your liking, and cook for ~30s. on each side. That’s all that’s standing between you and a stack of piping hot tortillas! Mine were a bit misshapen, but that is due entirely to rolling technique with an empty peanut butter jar. Still tasty and delicious, they are the perfect scooping vessel for whatever – from guacamole to this delicious stew!

There are different tortilla recipes in Viva Vegan!, but here is a step-by-step guide with pictures: Homemade Corn Tortillas. I don’t have a tortilla press, and just rolled out the dough in a circular(ish) shape between two pieces of parchment paper with my ‘rolling pin’ (aka. peanut butter jar). Even with this rudimentary method, I was slowed down in production by the size of my pan, not the speed of my rolling. I am sure you get prettier tortillas faster using a tortilla press, but for my kitchen my method worked just fine. After all, they only need to look pretty for the 5 seconds on the plate before you eat them!

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