Tag Archives: chickpea

Lebanese Falafel

Lebanese Falafel served with Cucumber Tomato salad and Lemon Tahini dressing

Lebanese Falafel served with Cucumber Tomato salad and Lemon Tahini dressing

I am addicted to falafel. I judge a city by it’s falafel offerings, and can be quite picky. I have lived in two cities with sub-standard falafel, and during that time I honed in on the craft of making my own and demanded that my first meal back in my hometown was falafel. I am a walking example of the Canadian fusion girl: craving Middle Eastern cuisine with the physique of a Scandinavian.

I have tried many versions of this staple, making an effort to write down every tweak and change. Some batches were fit only for the garbage; some made me yearn for the sub-standard offerings. But through dedication and perseverance, I found The Falafel Recipe. The trick: do not cook the beans. This is true throughout the Middle East: In Lebanon and Israel, chickpeas are used. In Egypt, the chickpeas are replaced with fava beans or a combination of fava beans and chick peas (I call this garfava, because it’s fun to say). To make the falafel more Egyptian, the amount of fresh herbs should be doubled, to the point where the falafel looks green. Of course, you could also use a green such as spinach or Swiss chard to get the same effect. Lebanese falafel is the “Canadian” version of Egyptian and Israeli: enough fresh herbs for significant speckles of green, but enough cumin and spice to remind you of Israeli falafel. The uncooked beans give you the classic falafel texture. Not smooth, but grainy (about the size of uncooked quinoa seeds), with a firm bite. For a true classic version, these should be deep fried or pan fried, but I am well aware of my kitchen limitations, and know that hot oil and a stove is a recipe for disaster. Baking is much safer 🙂

To serve these falafels, I have made the traditional falafel pita, made a deconstructed pita including a cucumber-tomato salad and tahini-lemon dressing (1:1 for tahini to lemon juice, mixed well. Add water for consistency as necessary, and some cayenne for spice) and pickled red onions, and eat them plain as snacks. These are by far the best falafels I have ever tasted, and well worth the cravings! (Note: I have not travelled to Israel, Lebanon, or Egypt. But when I do, one of my first stops will be a falafel stand!) Simple, easy, minimal dishes, freezer-friendly, and delicious, these falafels are worth their exalted status in my kitchen.

 

Lebanese Falafel

2 cups dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in water

1 small onion, chopped OR ½ cup chives, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

½ cup fresh parsley, chopped

2 tsp. ground cumin

1 tsp. ground coriander

½ tsp. paprika

¼ tsp. black pepper

4 tbsp. lemon juice

½ tsp. salt, or to taste

 

Directions:

1)      Drain soaked chickpeas. Rinse well and set aside.

2)      In food processor, add all ingredients. Process until reaches a consistency between couscous and hummus. *Note: Depending on the size of the food processor, may have to do this in batches

3)      Place 2 tbsp. of mixture in your hand, and roll into a ball. Place falafel on a parchment lined baking sheet. Repeat until no mixture left.

4)      Bake at 350oF for 20min. Carefully flip over falafel and bake an additional 10-15min, until falafel golden brown.

5)      Serve as a deconstructed falafel pita, as a topping for a salad, or plain!

 


Spicy Sour Chickpea Curry

Spicy Sour Chana Curry

Sometimes indecision can be a good thing. I entered the battle zone kitchen knowing only one thing: I wanted curry. Spicy? Tangy? Sour? Tomato based? Coconut milk based? All these questions flew through my mind as I assembled the curry vegetables. I quickly discovered that I had no tomatoes or coconut milk, so those options were out. But for flavour … I decided in the end to not make a decision. Thus, spicy sour chickpea curry was born!

The curry mixture is based off of this Spicy Squash Curry recipe that I’ve made in the past. The legume of choice was chickpeas for their meaty texture. The vegetables were inspired by my CSA of the week: eggplant, zucchini, the first cherry tomatoes and red peppers of the season, and swiss chard. I found some mushrooms in the fridge so they got added to the pot as well. The end result was better than I could have imagined, and exactly what I wanted! The curry is spicy from the hot peppers and chili powder, but it’s very tangy as well with both asafetida and amchoor (mango powder). The whole fenugreek and cumin seeds add depth, coriander for the ‘common’ curry binder, and turmeric to finish it off. The end result is a complex, unique flavour profile that is as spontaneous as the method of the recipe making! Definitely a crowd pleaser with its mixture of spicy and sour, and one that I will turn to time and time again the next time I am paralyzed by indecision. Enjoy!

Spicy Sour Chickpea Curry

*Note* It goes without saying that you can add or omit anything on this list to satisfy your own urges at the time. This is the version that I made, and it hit the spot! There is no substitution for mango powder in this recipe. It adds a unique tang to the dish, and is worth hunting out at an Indian market (my sample size has lasted me 2 years and counting). If absolutely necessary, I believe that 1 tbsp. of tamarind concentrate may result in the same tangy-sour notes, but this substitution is (as of yet) untested.

1 tbsp. ground coriander

1 tsp. fennel seeds

½ tsp. turmeric

1 tsp. chili powder

½ tsp. paprika

2 tsp. oil

1 tsp. cumin seeds

pinch of asafetidia

½ tsp. fenugreek seeds

4 whole dried red chilis, to taste

¼ tsp. salt, to taste

1 tbsp. fresh ginger, minced

 

1 medium eggplant, cut into ½” moons (approx. 4 cups)

1 large zucchini, cut into ½” moons (approx. 4 cups)

1 cup mushrooms, sliced

1 medium red bell pepper, cut into bite-sized pieces (scant 1 cup)

3 cups cooked chickpeas (2 (19oz. cans chickpeas, or 1 cup dried chickpeas, pre-cooked)

1 bunch swiss chard, roughly chopped (approx. 4 cups)

1 cup cherry tomatoes

1 tbsp. lemon juice

2 tbsp. fresh cilantro, chopped

1 tbsp. amchoor (mango powder)

 

Directions:

1) In a small bowl (or large measuring cup) mix together the ground coriander, fennel seed, chili powder, paprika, turmeric, and ¼ cup water to make a paste.

2) In large pot, heat oil on medium high. Add the cumin seeds and asafetida. Saute until cumin seeds begin to crack.

3) Add fenugreek seeds and red chilis. Stir.

4) Add the spice paste, salt, ginger, and ¼ cup water. Stir and sauté until fragrant, approx. 2min.

5) Add the eggplant, zucchini, and mushrooms. Stir, cover, and let steam until eggplant begins to soften, approx. 5min.

6) Add the bell pepper, chickpeas, and 4 cups water. Stir, cover, and bring to a boil. Lower heat and let simmer until eggplant tender, approx. 20min. Add water as necessary to adjust for consistency. (I added about 8-10 cups total)

7) Add the swiss chard, cherry tomatoes, cilantro, amchoor, and lemon juice. Stir, cover, and cook until greens bright green and slightly wilted. Adjust for seasonings.

8) Serve with rice and/or flatbread of choice.

 


Kala Chana

Kala Chana

Chickpeas are one of the unsung heroes of the legume world. (Lentils are the other). Not too terribly exciting, they demurely sit in many a pantry patiently waiting their turn. Often they are destined for hummus, other times in soups and stews. For those lucky few chickpeas, they are presented to the adventurous as besan, and maybe will end up being delicious socca or Burmese tofu. I have been known to make desserts out of them as well 🙂 These beans are taken for granted, often relegated to the sidelines. This doesn’t have to be the case! Enter Kala Chana, the venue for chickpeas to strut their stuff and shine.

Kala chana are actually black chickpeas, which are smaller and more robust than the more common garbanzo bean. I hunted them down in an Indian market, and immediately fell in love. Make no mistake – they’re still a chickpea, but with more texture and thus more presence. They also fool the eyes into thinking they’re more exotic than the garbanzo – think a black bean in garbanzo clothing! To truly appreciate this bean, I first set about finding a recipe that would really let it shine. Using the Internet, my standard Chana Masala recipe, and various other influences, I created this delicious Indian curry that is sure to satisfy all chickpea lovers out there. And convert all the ‘chickpea haters’. There’s more to the chickpea than hummus and a throw in!

This Kala Chana is a spicy Indian curry with a tomato puree base. I love using fresh tomatoes, green chilies, garlic, and onions and pureeing them first to create the curry sauce. I have also used canned tomatoes in the past, with fantastic results. The resulting puree is so fragrant you know it’ll be delicious. The tempering for this dish is cumin-seed based, with some asafoetida for sourness, coriander and turmeric for ‘curry spice’, and garam masala for a more savory taste. The green chilis and the red chili powder pack a punch, making the final product craveable. The besan (double chickpea action!) acts like a thickener, making the curry sauce have a bit more creaminess and ‘oomph’. I served it over greens, but you can be more traditional and serve it with rice and/or your flatbread of choice (Roti or naan make for great scooping vessels!). Hands down this is one of my favourite curry recipes, and one that I will keep going back to time and time again. All hail the chickpea!

 

Kala Chana

1 cup kala chana (dry) *Note: if you don’t have kala chana, substitute dried chickpeas. Just as tasty!

2 medium tomatoes, chopped

2 green chilis, chopped

1 tbsp. ginger, minced

1 tbsp. garlic, minced

1 tsp. canola oil

1 tsp. cumin seeds

⅛ tsp. asafoetida (hing)

1 tbsp. besan (chickpea flour)

1 tbsp. ground coriander

½ tsp. turmeric

½ tsp. garam masala

1 tsp. red chili powder

4 cups water + as needed

salt, to taste

fresh cilantro, chopped

 

Directions:

1) Soak kala chana overnight. Rinse and cook until al-dente.

2) In food processor, puree tomatoes, chilis, onion, and garlic.

3) In large pot heat oil on medium-high. Add cumin seeds and sauté until start to sizzle.

4) Add asafoetida and besan. Stir continuously and cook until besan light brown and toasted

5) Add coriander, turmeric, garam masala, and chili powder. Stir.

6) Add tomato puree. Stir and bring to a boil. Let cook until most moisture gone and starts to darken.

7) Add cooked kala chana, water, and salt. Bring to a boil, let simmer 20-30min.

8) Garnish with cilantro. Serve with rice and flatbread of choice.

 


Chickpea Pastel de Choclo

Chickpea Pastel de Choclo

When I first flipped through Viva Vegan! by Terry Hope Romero, I had significant difficulty choosing which recipe to try first. From the sheer volume of posts regarding this cookbook, it’s quite clear that I’m slowly making progress, and loving every delicious morsel. One recipe that was initially tagged as a “hm. that’s interesting” recipe was Chickpea Pastel de Choclo. Pastel de Choclo is a Chilean shepherd’s pie, but with a pureed fresh corn topping instead of the mashed potatoes. This particular version uses crumbled tempeh or chickpeas instead of meat, and retains all other flavours of the original.

What made me hesitant about this dish at first was that it includes raisins, green olives, and corn. Three ingredients that I go out of my way to avoid. Put them together? Apocalypse now, baby! Buoyed by all the other successes of Viva Vegan!, I put my faith in Terry one Saturday and tried it out. This very well be my favourite dish of the cookbook thus far! The raisins and olives marry together in a subtly sweet/salty combo that is nothing like I’ve ever tasted before. The other seasonings of oregano, cumin, and paprika round out the stew filling, making the filling utterly irresistible – a definite repeat by itself! I don’t know what sort of magic happens when these ingredients combine in the pot, but it has encouraged me to not be so hasty on judging the demure raisin.

The other real surprise of the dish is the corn topping. I used frozen corn making the topping method that much easier. Thawed kernels are pureed with garlic, salt, pepper, cornstarch, and a heavy cream. I used Almond Breeze, and it worked wonderfully. After the food processor works its magic, you’re left with something that looks like gruel. A quick simmer to thicken the topping (similar to Burmese Tofu), the addition of fresh basil, and it’s ready to pour over the filling. The fresh basil adds such punch to the pie as a whole; it complements the raisin/olive filling wonderfully. The pureed corn topping gets a nice browned crunch layer once baked – something I could never achieve with mashed potatoes. Overall, this dish was a pleasant surprise, and a nice departure from the spicy Latin dishes one comes to expect. It opened my eyes to new flavour combinations, and once again opened my kitchen to the glorious cuisine of Chile. I was greatly rewarded with my choice to expand my culinary horizons – I will remember this deliciousness the next time I see an ingredient list that makes me go “ick”!

The recipe can be found in Viva Vegan! on pg. 144-145, or on Google Book Preview here.

 


Tuscan Sundried Tomato Soup

Tuscan Sundried Tomato Soup

The best day of kindergarten was when we made Stone Soup. Every kid was responsible for bringing an ingredient from home – humble ingredients like carrots, cabbage, and potatoes. We then went out into the playground and searched for the ‘perfect’ stone for the soup. Finally, we made the soup in class, and slurped up every delicious morsel. I’m sure the teacher added seasonings and herbs to make it delicious, but nothing compared to the pride that my kindergarten self had knowing that in that soup was my carrot, and (in my mind) it was that carrot that made the soup so delicious. The perfect stone helped too 🙂

This soup can be considered ‘adult’ stone soup. Made of simple ingredients, it’s bursting with bright flavour that will amaze. Carrots, celery, and greens are joined with the star: sundried tomatoes. Tomatoes are such a humble ingredient, but when treated right they can really steal the show. Sundried tomatoes are packed with flavour, and with the addition of dried herbs and balsamic vinegar this soup is quite spectacular. Chickpeas round off the soup, making it a complete meal. Enjoy this version of stone soup, and take pride in the contribution of the carrot! (Stone optional).

Tuscan Sundried Tomato Soup

1¼ cup onion, diced
1½ tsp. garlic, minced
1 cup carrot, diced small (~2-3 medium carrots)
½ cup celery, diced small (If using Swiss chard, substitute  chard stems)
½ tsp. dried rosemary
1 tsp. dried basil
1 tsp. dried thyme
2 bay leaves
10 sundried tomatoes (NOT packed in oil), cut into strips (~¼ cup)
2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
8 cups water
3 cups cooked chickpeas (2 (19oz) cans chickpeas)
4 cups Swiss chard greens (or other greens), cut chiffonade style
paprika, pepper to taste

Directions:

1) In large pot, add onions, garlic, carrot, celery, herbs, and ½ cup water. Cover and bring to a simmer on medium-high heat. Cook until onions translucent, approx. 6min.
2) Add sundried tomatoes and balsamic vinegary. Stir, cover, and cook 1min.
3) Add chickpeas and remaining water. Stir, cover, and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer and let cook 10-15min, or until carrots are tender. Add water as necessary.
4) Add paprika and pepper to taste.
5) Add Swiss chard. Stir, cover, and cook until chard is bright green and wilted, approx. 1min.
6) Serve!


Roasted Tomato and Eggplant Stew

Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Stew

I’ve been saving this post for a rainy day. This is by far one of my favourite comfort soups of all time. Tied with Spicy Peanut and Eggplant Stew, this stew is the equivalent spending a lazy Sunday afternoon on the sofa wrapped in a comfy blanket watching movies like An Affair to Remember while it pours rain outside. And not feeling guilty about the pile of laundry kicked behind the door.

Compliments of the must-have Veganomicon by the pioneers of accessible, delicious vegan cooking Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero, this stew was the feature dish at more than one family holiday gathering. It was so popular in fact, by the time my turn came to fill up, the pot was empty! I couldn’t blame them – who can resist the allure of roasted bell peppers, the delicious aroma of roasted garlic, and the creamy interior yet slightly crispy roasted eggplant chips? I know I can’t! The recipe takes some forethought due to the aforementioned roasting, but once that’s done it’s quite simple. Sauté the onions, add MORE garlic, add the tomatoes and build the spice base of thyme, tarragon, and a dash of paprika for heat. Add the roasted vegetables, some chickpeas for protein, and voila. A hearty stew that is so flavourful and delicious you may moan. My family has used the stew as a ratatouille, topping pasta with it (and quite clearly loved it that way!). I’m a purist – why waste stomach room with pasta when you can go for thirds?

I have made this multiple times, and as usual I have made some adjustments. I usually cut the oil called for down to 1-2tsp. to sauté the onions only. To roast the veggies, place them on your cookie sheet and lightly spray with olive oil (or pam). This works much better for me, as when I try to brush the surfaces with oil it never comes out even and things always get burned. Also, watch the veggies when roasting – my various rental ovens run hot or cold, so I have had both raw and burnt roasted veggies following the instructions. To combat this, I usually roast at 375oF, and check on them every 20min, with a max roast time of 45min. Whenever possible, I try to use dried chickpeas that are cooked instead of canned. I find that this is a firmer texture, and more delicious. However, when combating cravings, reaching for whatever canned bean you have on hand (or even lentils to throw in while it’s simmering) is also delicious. Finally, all stews taste better with greens! Don’t be shy – throw in spinach, kale, lettuce, swiss chard, whatever green you have on hand. It breaks up the soup colour, and adds an additional texture element.

If you only make one recipe from Veganomicon, this is it. Melt in your mouth eggplant, roasted garlic, roasted bell peppers, in a rich tomato stew. You can’t go wrong.

In addition to being found in Veganomicon, the recipe can be found here: Roasted Tomato and Eggplant Stew.


Asure (Noah’s Pudding)

Asure

Asure (also known as Noah’s Pudding) is a refreshing end to a Turkish meal. Many Turkish desserts are composed of some variation of phyllo pastry, laden with honey and pistachios. But not this one. Legend has it that when Noah was busy counting the animals, Mrs. Noah was frantically cleaning the pantry and whipped this dessert up with all the contents. As a result, there are as many variations of Asure as there are pantries! After copious amounts of research, the required elements for Asure are as follows:

1) Grain: barley, rice, bulgur wheat
2) Dried fruit: apricot, figs, raisins, currants, cranberries
3) Nuts: Walnuts, pistachios, pine nuts, pecans, almonds, hazelnuts
4) Flavour: orange peel, rose water (1-2 tsp.), vanilla, orange juice
5) Beans: broad beans (lima beans), black-eyed peas, chickpeas, white beans

From there, you can create your masterpiece! A recipe written just the way I cook! I have made variations for breakfast, similar to the Chinese congee. Of course, it makes a wonderful dessert as well, similar to rice pudding. Also note that Noah must be a slow counter – this recipe takes 1-2 days to make due to bean soaking time (and lack of pots in my kitchen), but it makes a LOT. It freezes exceptionally well: to warm up, take one serving straight from the freezer and add a dash of water. Microwave on high until you reach pudding consistency (~3min.) Packed full of nutrition and delicious too boot – that’s a dessert you can feel good about eating for breakfast!

Asure

1 cup barley
1 cup dried white beans
1 cup dried chickpeas
1 cup short-grain rice
1 cup raisins OR currants
1 cup sugar OR molasses (to taste)
10 cups water
10 dried apricots, diced
10 dried figs, diced
1 tbsp. orange rind
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. vanilla

Optional garnishes: crushed walnuts, crushed pistachios, soaked and diced dried fruit such as figs, apricots, currants; pomegranate seeds …

Directions:
1) Bring 4 cups water to a boil. Add barley and cook for 10min.
2) Turn off heat and leave barley to soak overnight
3) Repeat steps 1-2 for white beans and chickpeas in separate pots
4) Add 4 cups water to barley, white beans, and chickpea pots
5) Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer until barley, white beans, and chickpeas are cooked (note: each has a different cooking time!)
6) In 16 quart pot, add 10 cups water
7) Add cooked barley, white beans, chickpeas, uncooked rice, and orange rind. Bring to a boil and cook 10-15min.
8) Add all other ingredients. Cook on medium 15-20min, or until rice cooked. Stir occasionally and add water as necessary – should have the consistency of tapioca
9) Turn off heat and let rest for 30min.
10) Pour into small bowls and add optional garnishes

For the version shown above, I used all the beans and grains listed. My dried fruits were figs, dates, apricots, and currants. I didn’t add any sugar as the dried fruit made the porridge sweet enough for me! I added a tiny splash of rose water which made the porridge smell amazing and added an extra layer of ‘exotic’ taste.


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