Tag Archives: quinoa flour

Sancocho and Chocolate Orange Dulce de Batata Cake

This Latin feast is compliments of Viva Vegan! by Terry Hope Romero. Once again, Terry delivers massive Latin flavour that will make you exercise all your restraint to not eat the whole thing before making it out of the kitchen. I am a novice to Latin food, but these recipes that I have previously written about (and with more to come!) have me seeking out Latin food wherever I can!

Sancocho

Sancocho: The Latin Sambar.

The Sancocho could be best described as a Latin Sambar – they are so similar in fact I often get the two confused! They are both soothing, spicy, comfort foods in a bowl. Sancocho is coloured the distinctive Latin Chorizo “hue” with Annatto spice, the Latin turmeric. The rest of the seasoning is the standard Latin combination of oregano and cumin, supplemented with some thyme and heaps of onions. The soup is loaded with veggies: carrot, yucca, green plantains, tomatoes, and corn. Lima beans add the protein element, and are deliciously creamy. For those with Lima issues, Fava beans, edamame, pinto beans, or even chickpeas would be a wonderful stand-in. I made some modifications to the recipe – I hate corn. With a passion. Thus I omitted the corn on the cob from my soup, and I think it didn’t suffer from intent at all! Although I will not deny – eating corn on a cob in a soup sounds pretty cool. I also added some spinach at the end, because greens in soups are never wrong! The resulting soup is soothing, delicious, and exotic enough to make you think you can cook any Latin dish you desire. (I may be delusional.) This is the perfect soup to usher in the not-quite-ready spring produce but tired of the winter standards of squash and potatoes.

The recipe can be found on p. 154-155 of Viva Vegan!, or on Google Books here.

Chocolate Orange Dulce de Batata Cake

Chocolate Orange Dulce de Batata Cake: Not too sweet, slightly spicy, and all around delicious!

The Chocolate Orange Dulce de Batata Cake is a surprise all in of itself. The frosting is actually Dulce de Batata, which is an orange-infused sweet potato pudding. Yes – sweet potato! I have never had sweet potato as part of a dessert before (or any non-savoury application after the Mashed Sweet Potato and Marshmallow experiences of my childhood – ick), and so I knew I had to try this cake just for that reason. To make the Dulce de Batata is relatively easy – basically boil sweet potatoes to a mash, and stir constantly to make sure it doesn’t burn the bottom of the pan. A helpful tip: use a lid when you reach pudding consistency, otherwise you will end up with sweet potato splatters all over your kitchen. The aroma from this dish was what really surprised me – it was very difficult not eating the entire pot as soon as it was made. The sweet potato taste isn’t pungent, and the cinnamon and orange pair wonderfully.

The chocolate cake is a typical chocolate cake, but with the addition of ‘spice’ cake spices and orange juice. It pairs well with the dulce de batata, and again isn’t a sweet cake. I used a combination of quinoa and buckwheat flour, and it came out wonderfully moist, and had a great crumb. The instructions say to cook the cake as one layer, and then cut the layers in two. I could foresee that disaster, and instead opted to cook two layers of cake separately, and reduced the cooking time. To “frost”, you smear as much dulce de batata as you can on the top of one half, add the second layer of cake, and frost with the remaining dulce de batata. The combination is phenomenal, and definitely something you could serve to company and bask in the compliments. Not too sweet, slightly spicy, and with the hint of orange, it is a chocolate cake you will crave. Especially so for people who are not partial to sweet desserts, and usually avoid chocolate cakes for this reason. I froze my leftovers and ate the rest like cake pops, and I think I liked that serving style even better than eating it fresh!

The recipe can be found on p. 236-239 of Viva Vegan!, or on Google Books here.

Sancocho and Chocolate Dulce de Batata cake – the latest Latin offerings that have continued to open my eyes to the delicious offerings of the Central and South Americas!


Queen Elizabeth Cake

Queen Elizabeth Cake I Recipe

*Note* This is not my picture. The cupcakes disappeared too quickly for me to get a good one. Photo courtesy of AllRecipes.com.

Ironically enough, I first experienced Queen Elizabeth Cake in a tiny coffee shop tucked away under the shadow of Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City, Canada. Ironic because the Quebecois are potentially the most antagonistic “subjects” of the Commonwealth towards the British, and don’t much care for the “English” in general. Yet it was in this cute cafe that my friend and I experienced Queen Elizabeth Cake.

The cake itself has an interesting history: the Queen Mum would make it herself for the sole purpose of bake sales with proceeds going to the Church of England. Apparently Queens can cook too! (More information can be found here). It is a date cake with a coconut frosting reminiscent of German Chocolate Cake frosting. It’s not too sweet, and an excellent pairing with an afternoon cup of tea. Both my friend and I loved sneaking away to this small cafe and having a cup of tea with a small slice of cake before perusing the local indie music store. Since then, the cafe is no longer, I am a vegan, and she is a celiac. So, for her birthday I took it upon myself to take these memories of afternoon tea and cake and make a cake just as good – if not better – than the Queen’s. Two weeks of research went into this project, with numerous chicken-scratch recipe drafts. Finally, I had it. The result? “Amazing! They sure didn’t last long!” So take a slice of history and make this vegan, gluten free version of the Queen Mum’s classic – but you don’t have to share it with the Church of England!

 

 

Queen Elizabeth (Cup)Cake

Cake:
1 cup boiling water
1 cup dried dates, pitted and chopped
2 tbsp. plain yogurt OR 2 tbsp. unsweetened applesauce
+ 1 tsp. canola oil
½ cup white sugar
¼ cup silken tofu, pureed (puree then measure)
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup quinoa flour
¼ cup glutinous rice flour
¼ cup coconut flour
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
½ cup walnuts, chopped

Directions:
1) In small bowl, pour boiling water over dates. Soak until water tepid
2) In small bowl mix flours, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and nuts
3) In large bowl cream together tofu and sugar. Add vanilla, yoghurt, and half of the soaked dates. Mix.
4) Add flour mixture in batches, mixing to combine as you go
5) Fold in remaining dates
6) Spread batter into greased 9×13” pan, or lined muffin tins
7) Bake at 350oF for 30-40min. (20-30min. for cupcakes), or until pass the knife test
8) Cool

Icing:
1 cup flaked coconut
½ cup almond milk
⅓ cup brown sugar, packed
2 tbsp. cornstarch mixed with 2 tbsp. water until smooth

Directions:
1) In medium saucepan mix milk, sugar, and vanilla
2) Add cornstarch slurry and cook over medium-high heat stirring constantly, until mixture boils and thickens
3) Cook for 1 min while boiling. Remove from heat.
4) Stir in coconut
5) Allow to cool until warm before spreading onto cake

 

 

 

 


Mushroom Wonton Soup

Wonton soup … the Chinese restaurant staple. My sister judges the quality of the Chinese restaurant by their wonton soup. Once the wontons are made, it’s a simple, quick dinner that is easily adaptable to the contents of your fridge. Just another example of comfort food in a bowl. Wontons themselves are very easy to prepare, and are assembled quicker than their Ukrainian cousins, the perogi. Like all dumplings, they are also infinitely adaptable as to fillings. Generally, I like to fill my dumplings with ‘culture neutral’ flavour profiles, so I know that the dumpling will match whatever gets thrown into the pot for consumption. So no black bean-mole wontons this time – although I’m not saying that the combination would be horrible!

For the wonton wrappers you can buy pre-made and pre-cut wonton squares at the grocery store or Asian market, but I opted to make my own. Pre-made would probably be easier, but making the dough is simple and the dough is very easy to work with. No difficulties making the cute little ‘Nurses hats’ with this assembly! I didn’t cook the wontons when I made them and instead froze them uncooked. Then, when you are ready to enjoy some wonton soup (or just the wontons by themselves with some sautéed greens!), stick them directly in the pot with the other goodies and they cook within 10 mins. Simple!

Mushroom Wontons

 Wonton Wrappers

1 cup quinoa flour
1 cup spelt flour (or 1 cup quinoa flour for Gluten Free)
½ tsp. salt
½ cup warm water

Directions:
1) In large bowl, sift together flours and salt.
2) Slowly add warm water, mixing as you pour.
3) Knead dough for ~10 min., until smooth ball forms
4) Cover with clean dishtowel and let rest 20 min.
 
Mushroom Wonton Filling

I used this recipe found here.

You can create your own filling combinations as you see fit. I have made wontons before with tofu, scallions, other vegetables, or with edamame. This filling is delicious however, and has not met a wonton soup combination it does not like! Follow these instructions for wonton assembly, and you will have an army of wontons in no time!

An Army of Wontons, ready for the soup pot!

For the soup, generally I use my Miso Soup guidelines for the flavour profile, which allows the wontons to pick up on the vegetable and broth flavours while cooking. Miso Soup is another comfort food staple, and the ratios of the soup pot is entirely dependent on what needs to be used in the fridge. I like my soup to be more like a stew, while I know others who would scoff at my interpretation and insist on a couple of scallions, a cup of mushrooms, and 8 litres of broth. To each their own – it’s delicious no matter how you cook it! My guidelines for Miso Soup are below.

Wonton/Miso Soup Guidelines

½ cup cauliflower florets
½ cup broccoli florets, or 1 cup Chinese broccoli, cut into 1″ pieces
1 medium carrot, diced
1 cup shredded greens: kale, napa cabbage, bok choi, or more Chinese broccoli work well!
1-2 scallions, sliced into 1″ pieces
4-5 mushrooms, sliced
3 cups vegetable broth or water
1 tsp. low-sodium soy sauce
1 tsp. rice wine vinegar

Optional: dash of sesame oil, tofu, edamame …

Wonton Soup: Add as many wontons as you like! Generally I add 2-4

Miso Soup: Add 1 tbsp. miso paste – red miso is my favourite

Directions:
1) In pot, add broccoli and cauliflower. Cover with lid and turn on high heat. You want to steam and slightly burn the cauliflower and broccoli.
2) Watching carefully, give the pot a shake now and then to make sure the vegetables don’t burn too much.
3) Add the carrots, cover, and steam approximately 30s.
4) Add the vegetable broth, soy sauce, and rice wine vinegar. Bring to a boil. (If making wonton soup, add wontons with the water)
5) Add all remaining vegetables. Lower heat to a simmer, and let simmer approximately 5 min.
6) If making miso soup, add the miso paste. Be careful not to let the soup boil with the miso – this ruins some of the miso flavour
7) Serve garnished with fresh cilantro and Sriracha!


Fusion Pizza: Sweet Potato Crust with Kale and Vegetable Curry

The Moroccan Fusion Pizza was such a success I decided to create another fusion pizza! I had some sweet potatoes that had been languishing in the fridge for too long, and were begging to be used before they became a new life form. I remembered reading a recipe for sweet potato biscuits, so I decided that if you could make biscuits out of sweet potatoes, you can make pizza dough! This thought process led me immediately to crunchy kale, because nothing goes better with sweet potatoes than kale. (Except maybe black beans). Unfortunately for my fridge, I had stocked for my original weekend plan of Vegetable Curry, and now with the change of plans those vegetables were looking forlorn and forgotten. So I made the curry anyway, and topped the pizza creation with a nice spicy, saucy, vegetable curry. The result? Fantastic! These fusion pizzas are the way to go! Unexpected flavours when you say the word ‘pizza’, these heavily topped flatbreads are mouth-wateringly delicious. And as an extra bonus, you will have curry leftovers for lunch the next day.

For the vegetable curry topping, I used this vegetable curry recipe. It is very quick to throw together, and I found the idea of making a fresh tomato puree sauce unique. The tomato puree sauce is a new culinary trick that I will keep in my back pocket for other opportunities – it would make a great salad dressing, dipping sauce, or even a cold soup like gazpacho! For the vegetables I used all leftover and forlorn veg in my fridge. This version had extra cauliflower, bell peppers, sugar snap peas, mushrooms, and carrots. I added broccoli to the mix, because slightly charred broccoli is perhaps more delicious than slightly charred kale. But only slightly. The curry was delicious on its own, with layers of flavours reminiscent of Northern Indian curries with a nice kick at the end. The only improvement I would make would be to add some red lentils to simmer with the tomato puree sauce for extra creaminess and a bit of protein. 

As the curry already had a tomato sauce, I skipped the sauce step of the ‘flatbread + sauce + toppings’ formula of a pizza. Instead, after baking the crust I lined the base with a healthy amount of kale, and then added a mound of curry. This technique was excellent and far exceeded expectations. The kale near the edge of the pizza turned nice and crispy, and the centre pieces became soft and marinated with that delicious curry flavour! The crust itself was one of the best I have ever had. The dough is quite sticky, and parchment paper here is worth its weight in gold. The crust comes out still soft with some crispy edges, and is almost nutty in flavour, thanks to the quinoa flour. It would be delicious on its own as a flatbread, focaccia, or even baked a bit more for some breadsticks used for dipping vessels! Plus, it’s orange. Who doesn’t like coloured food? With the kale and curry topping, it is one of the prettiest pizzas I have ever made!

Sweet Potato Pizza Crust

2 cups mashed sweet potatoes, cooled (approx. 1 large sweet potato)
1 cup quinoa flour
1 cup spelt flour (chickpea flour or more quinoa flour would also be delicious!)
1 tsp. baking powder
4 tbsp. cold water
2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil

Directions:
1) In large bowl, mix all ingredients together
2) Spread onto parchment lined cookie sheet
3) Bake at 400 dF for 10 min.
4) Allow to cool slightly, then add toppings.

5) Once pizza topped, bake in oven 20 min. Allow to cool slightly.
Slice and serve!

Bet you can’t eat just one!

 


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